J Korean Assoc Oral Maxillofac Surg 2019; 45(4): 215~219
Comparison of postoperative paresthesia after sagittal split osteotomy among different fixation methods: a one year follow-up study
Reza Tabrizi1,2, Kousha Bakrani2, Farshid Bastami1,3
1Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran,
2Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, School of Dentistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz,
3Dental Research Center, Research Institute of Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Farshid Bastami
Dental Research Center, Research Institute of Dental Sciences, and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Velenjak St., Shahid Chamran Highway, Tehran 1983963113, Iran
TEL: +98-9126704434 FAX: +98-2122427753
E-mail: farshidbastami@sbmu.ac.ir
ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6332-4032
Received January 15, 2019; Revised May 8, 2019; Accepted May 12, 2019.; Published online August 31, 2019.
© The Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Objectives: Postoperative paresthesia is a common complication after sagittal split osteotomy (SSO). This study aimed to compare paresthesia among different fixation methods one year postoperative.
Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study assessed subjects in four groups: class II with miniplate fixation (Group 1), class II with three-screw fixation (Group 2), class III with miniplate fixation (Group 3), and class III with three-screw fixation (Group 4). Paresthesia was evaluated one year postoperative based on a 0-10 visual analogue scale. Pearson correlation was used to evaluate associations of age and mandibular movement with paresthesia. ANOVA was used to compare paresthesia among groups.
Results: A total of 80 subjects were enrolled, with 20 subjects in each of the four groups. The Pearson correlation test demonstrated a significant correlation between mandibular movement and paresthesia (P=0.001). Comparison of paresthesia among the groups showed significant differences among groups 1 and 2, 2 and 3, and 3 and 4 (P<0.05).
Conclusion: The three-screw fixation method led to more paresthesia one year postoperative compared with miniplate fixation. In addition, the magnitude of mandibular movement had a positive correlation with paresthesia.
Keywords: Mandible, Paresthesia, Sagittal split osteotomy, Skeletal deformity, Inferior alveolar nerve


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31 August 2019
Vol. 45
No. 4 pp. 173~230

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