J Korean Assoc Oral Maxillofac Surg 2019; 45(1): 29~33
The evaluation of implant stability measured by resonance frequency analysis in different bone types
Naser Sargolzaie1, Sarah Samizade2, Hamidreza Arab1, Habibollah Ghanbari1, Leila Khodadadifard1, Amin Khajavi1,*
1Department of Periodontics, College of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Science, Mashhad, 2Department of Periodontics, College of Dentistry, Sabzevar University of Medical Science, Sabzevar, Iran
Leila Khodadadifard
Department of Periodontics, College of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Science, Park Square, Mashhad 9197995185, Iran
TEL: +98-9153057255 FAX: +98-5137669028
E-mail: l.khodadadifard@gmail.com
ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7517-2152
Received April 12, 2018; Revised May 23, 2018; Accepted May 23, 2018.; Published online February 28, 2019.
© The Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Objectives: Bone density seems to be an important factor affecting implant stability. The relationship between bone density and primary and secondary stability remains under debate. The aim of this study was to compare primary and secondary stability measured by resonance frequency analysis (RFA) between different bone types and to compare implant stability at different time points during 3 months of follow-up.
Materials and Methods: Our study included 65 implants (BioHorizons Implant Systems) with 3.8 or 4.6 mm diameter and 9 or 10.5 mm length in 59 patients. Bone quality was assessed by Lekholm–Zarb classification. After implant insertion, stability was measured by an Osstell device using RFA at three follow-up visits (immediately, 1 month, and 3 months after implant insertion). ANOVA test was used to compare primary and secondary stability between different bone types and between the three time points for each density type.
Results: There were 9 patients in type I, 18 patients in type II, 20 patients in type III, and 12 patients in type IV. Three implants failed, 1 in type I and 2 in type IV. Stability values decreased in the first month but increased during the following two months in all bone types. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between RFA values of different bone types at each follow-up or between stability values of each bone type at different time points.
Conclusion: According to our results, implant stability was not affected by bone density. It is difficult to reach a certain conclusion about the effect of bone density on implant stability as stability is affected by numerous factors.
Keywords: Dental implant, Implant stability, Implant stability quotient


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28 February 2019
Vol. 45
No. 1 pp. 1~47

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